WORDLIST: -- Friday I London a about all are carriages city closed days dissipation dusky fog had heavens in indeed is its looked most occasion occasions perceive sky stations still the there through up way weather-proof were

Henry James, Jr.

AN ENGLISH EASTER 5

(......) Passion Week, in London, is distinctly an ascetic period; _____ is really an approach to sackcloth and ashes. Private ___________ is suspended; most of the theatres and music-halls are ______; the huge dusky city seems to take on a _____ sadder coloring and a sort of hush steals over ___ mighty uproar. At such a time, for a stranger, ______ is not cheerful. Arriving there, during the past winter, _____ Christmas-time-, I encountered three British Sundays in a row -__- a spectacle to strike terror into the stoutest heart.

(......) From Good Friday to Easter Monday, inclusive, they ____ very much en evidence, and it was an excellent ________ for getting an impression of the British populace. Gentility ___ retired to the background and in the West End ___ the blinds were lowered; the streets were void of _________ and well-dressed pedestrians were rare; but the *masses* were ___ abroad and making the most of their holiday, and _ strolled about and watched them at their gambols. The _______ were most unfavorable, but in an English *outing* there __ always a margin left for a drenching, and throughout ___ vast smoky city, beneath the shifting gloom of the ___ the grimy crowds trooped about with a kind of _____________ stolidity. The parks were full of them, the railway ________ overflowed and the Thames embankment was covered. The *,masses,* _ think, are usually an entertaining spectacle, even when observed _______ the glutinous medium of London bad weather. There are ______ few things in their way more impressive than a _____ London holiday; it suggests a variety of reflections. Even ______ at superficially the British capital is one of the ____ interesting of cities, and it is perhaps on such _________ as this that I have most felt its interest. ______ is ugly, dusky, dreary, more destitute than any European ____ of graceful and decorative incident; and though on festal ____, like those I speak of, the populace is massed __ large numbers at certain points, many of the streets ___ empty enough of human life to enable you to ________ their intrinsic hideousness. A Christmas Day or a Good ______ uncovers the ugliness of London. As you walk along ___ streets, having no fellow-pedestrians to look at, you look __ at the brown brick house-walls-, corroded with soot and ___, pierced with their straight stiff window-slits and finished, by ___ of a cornice, with a little black line resembling _ slice of curb-stone-.